Tag Archives: america

‘America’s Frankenstein’: Book to examine Philly’s ‘first mass murderer’

An upcoming book seeks to find the links between the fable of Frankenstein and a brutal Philadelphia mass murder that occurred nearly 50 years after the release of the famous novel.

In “The Face of a Monster: America’s Frankenstein,” Delaware author Patricia Earnest Suter revisits the gruesome killings of eight people at the hands of Anton Probst in 1866.

A German immigrant, Probst came to the United States in 1863 and became a “bounty jumper” during the Civil War, joining up with Union regiments and collecting his check before deserting and doing the same with another troop.

After squandering away his money, he took a job for the Deering family as a farm hand in rural Philadelphia. To enrich himself, he

Read more at: http://www.phillyvoice.com/americas-frankenstein-book-examine-phillys-first-mass-murderer/

‘America’s Frankenstein’: Book to examine Philly’s ‘first mass …

An upcoming book seeks to find the links between the fable of Frankenstein and a brutal Philadelphia mass murder that occurred nearly 50 years after the release of the famous novel.

In “The Face of a Monster: America’s Frankenstein,” Delaware author Patricia Earnest Suter revisits the gruesome killings of eight people at the hands of Anton Probst in 1866.

A German immigrant, Probst came to the United States in 1863 and became a “bounty jumper” during the Civil War, joining up with Union regiments and collecting his check before deserting and doing the same with another troop.

After squandering away his money, he took a job for the Deering family as a farm hand in rural Philadelphia. To enrich himself, he

Read more at: http://www.phillyvoice.com/americas-frankenstein-book-examine-phillys-first-mass-murderer/

What looks hot for 2018 arts? ‘Black Panther,’ ‘Angels in America,’ dancing with your DNA

So much about 2017 was forgettable. So let’s turn our attention to the new year and the bounty of arts and entertainment it promises. Here are a few of our critics’ and writers’ favorite things on the 2018 landscape.

Film: A superhero bonanza

Comic book fans, prepare to geek out uncontrollably. The 2018 film calendar is stuffed with promising superhero offerings, but it’s not only the good guys and women getting in on the action. Even a couple anti-heroes are kicking it up on the big screen.

Of the bunch, the one I’m most psyched about East Bay director Ryan Coogler’s “Black Panther,” which finds King T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman) suiting up in the titular role to save the world. With an exceptional cast (Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong’o, Daniel Kaluuya, Forest Whitaker and Andy Serkis) and a proven filmmaker, this could well be one of Marvel’s finest. It opens, appropriately, during Black

Read more at: https://www.mercurynews.com/2018/01/02/what-looks-hot-for-2018-arts-black-panther-angels-in-america-dancing-with-your-dna/

America’s normalization of mass shootings since Sandy Hook | Opinion

In the five years that have now passed by since the horrific mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, we have come to treat public mass shootings as normal — or at least with a known routine.

We wait to learn about the shooter while listening for the praise given first responders (rightfully) for their speedy and brave actions and to hospital personnel for their trauma care (again, rightfully) as, afterwards, ordinary citizens graciously open their hearts offering support, blood, and money (admirably) while community leaders tell the grieving families (decently) they are in our thoughts and prayers. Then we learn (sadly) about the precious lives lost. That’s what we do.

As I listened to the end-to-end news coverage of the shooting in Las Vegas — now the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history — I remembered hearing it all before. And a month later, we heard it all again after

Read more at: http://www.sun-sentinel.com/opinion/commentary/fl-op-viewpoint-sandy-hook-gun-control-lessons-20171219-story.html

17 Things in 2017: Mass shootings in America

Some of the most painful marks from 2017 have involved the tragic mass shootings that have taken place across the nation. This year alone, 574 people were killed in America because of mass shootings, and hundreds more have been wounded. While each shooting is painful and tragic, the Las Vegas massacre became the worst mass shooting in modern American history.

On October 1, over 22,000 concertgoers attending a country music festival in Las Vegas, Nevada had their night of happiness turn into one of horror as Stephen Paddock rained bullets on the crowd. After firing over 1,100 rounds, Paddock had killed 58 people and injured 546 more. It is still unknown what motivated Paddock, who unleashed this tragedy from the confines of his Mandalay

Read more at: http://www.fsunews.com/story/news/2017/12/19/17-things-2017-mass-shootings-america/962190001/

How Sandy Hook changed America’s schools

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — The December 2012 mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School that left 20 students and six educators dead, along with the gunman and his mother, left a lasting mark on the way students, parents and officials around the country view school safety. In addition to reigniting debates over gun control and mental health care, it helped usher in an era of “active shooter drills” and difficult conversations about safety for even the youngest kids.

In the days leading up to the fifth anniversary of the attack in Newtown, Connecticut, CBS News producer Christina Ruffini facilitated a series of conversations with residents of Colorado, a state where gun issues have remained divisive, even after two infamous mass shootings of its own at Columbine High School and an Aurora movie theater.

In one conversation, Daniel and Jessica — parents of young children who came to the

Read more at: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/how-sandy-hook-changed-americans-schools-2-parents-discuss/

Mass murderers: running amok in America

In 1966, Charles Whitman, the so-called Texas Tower Mass Murderer, shot 17 people from the rooftop of a University of Texas building in Austin and was ultimately slain by police.

I had two professors at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston who believed that a small portion of the brain called the amygdala played a large role controlling violent behavior. The professors flew down to Dallas to witness Whitman’s autopsy. He turned out to have a brain tumor. It was an atypical neoplasm with malignant characteristics, and the professors took the position that the tumor might have invaded part of the amygdala and been possibly implicated in Whitman’s rage attack. Later, they authored a controversial book called “Violence and the Brain” in which they promulgated the theory that violence stems from brain dysfunction. But Whitman was a Marine with a host of mental problems, all of which could easily have played a

Read more at: http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/opinion/oped/bs-ed-op-1207-running-amok-20171205-story.html

How other countries can help us understand America’s mass shooting crisis – WBIR

When Devin Kelley entered the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, on Nov. 5 and shot and killed 26 people, it became the 308th mass shooting of 2017 in the United States. It came four weeks after the Las Vegas shooting, when Stephen Paddock killed 59 people from a 32nd-floor hotel room above an open-air country music concert.

Since the Sutherland Springs shooting, there have been more than 10 mass shooting events, according to the Gun Violence Archive, a website that tracks incidents where four or more people are shot. The bleak totals for 2017 in mass shootings in America: 415 killed and more than 1,700 wounded.

Read more at: http://www.wbir.com/article/news/nation-now/how-other-countries-can-help-us-understand-americas-mass-shooting-crisis/465-3b21e528-e262-461d-94d8-3f8a0cd98365

How other countries can help us understand America’s mass shooting crisis

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A mass shooting researcher discusses how a shooter’s history can push people to commit mass killings.
USA TODAY

When Devin Kelley entered the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, on Nov. 5 and shot and killed 26 people, it became the 308th mass shooting of 2017 in the United States. It came four weeks after the Las Vegas shooting, when Stephen Paddock killed 59 people from a 32nd-floor hotel room above an open-air country music concert.

Since the Sutherland Springs shooting, there have been more than

Read more at: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2017/11/20/how-other-countries-can-help-us-understand-americas-mass-shooting-crisis/880039001/

How other countries can help us understand America’s mass shooting crisis

When Devin Kelley entered the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, on Nov. 5 and shot and killed 26 people, it became the 308th mass shooting of 2017 in the United States. It came four weeks after the Las Vegas shooting, when Stephen Paddock killed 59 people from a 32nd-floor hotel room above an open-air country music concert.

Listen to the Story.

Since the Sutherland Springs shooting, there have been more than 10 mass shooting events, according to the Gun Violence Archive, a website that tracks incidents where four or more people are shot. The bleak totals for 2017 in mass shootings in America: 415 killed and more than 1,700 wounded.

Both events have reignited America’s gun debate. Earlier this week, Senate Democrats reintroduced an updated assault weapons ban, but no Republicans have supported

Read more at: https://www.pri.org/stories/2017-11-17/how-other-countries-can-help-us-understand-americas-mass-shooting-crisis