Tag Archives: death

Howard Unruh’s 1949 “Walk of Death,” the first modern mass shooting.

Howard Unruh’s 1949 “Walk of Death” through Camden, New Jersey, left 13 dead and three injured. Contemporaneous accounts of his “berserk” rampage—most notable among them the extensively syndicated, Pulitzer Prize–winning account from the New York Times’ Meyer Berger—are colorful, cinematic, and intensely visual. These pieces were designed less to soberly inform than to titillate and transport. In his detailed breakdown of how the “Walk of Death” unfolded—the circuit involved Unruh’s mother’s house, a cobbler, a tailor, a barber, a neighborhood restaurant, a druggist, and a stranger’s apartment—Berger offers up narrative minutiae he can’t possibly know. “He [Unruh] took one last look around his bedroom before he left the house,” we read. This vivid voiceover doubles as a transition into the ghastly décor Unruh presumably sees: “Scattered about the chamber were machetes, a Roy Rogers pistol, ashtrays made of German Shells, clips of 30-30 cartridges for rifle use and a

Read more at: http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/politics/2017/10/howard_unruh_s_1949_walk_of_death_the_first_modern_mass_shooting.html

America’s freedom fundamentalism impervious to death

Around the world, people are aghast at the latest atrocity in the US, involving military-grade weapons, easily acquired, often lawfully owned.

Flummoxed at how such unspeakable brutalities are allowed to occur, and then simply occur again.

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A fate worse than death?

When thrice-convicted spree killer Nicholas T. Sheley enters a Missouri courtroom Wednesday, he is expected to do something he was previously loath to do: admit in court he is a murderer.

Sheley, 38, formerly of Sterling, could have sought a plea agreement in the June 2008 killing of Ronald Randall of Galesburg.

He didn’t.

Sheley could have sought a plea agreement in the June 2008 killing of Russell Reed of rural Sterling.

He didn’t.

Sheley could have sought a plea agreement in the June 2008 killings in a Rock Falls apartment of Brock Branson, Kilynna Blake, Dayan Blake and Kenneth Ulve.

He didn’t.

Expensive trials had to be conducted in 2011, 2012 and 2014, respectively, in those Illinois cases to obtain murder convictions and life sentences in prison – the maximum allowed by Illinois law.

In January, Sheley is to be put on trial for the June 2008 killings of Tom and Jill Estes, an Arkansas couple who

Read more at: http://www.saukvalley.com/2017/09/28/a-fate-worse-than-death/avfthre/

A fate worse than death? | SaukValley.com

When thrice-convicted spree killer Nicholas T. Sheley enters a Missouri courtroom Wednesday, he is expected to do something he was previously loath to do: admit in court he is a murderer.

Sheley, 38, formerly of Sterling, could have sought a plea agreement in the June 2008 killing of Ronald Randall of Galesburg.

He didn’t.

Sheley could have sought a plea agreement in the June 2008 killing of Russell Reed of rural Sterling.

He didn’t.

Sheley could have sought a plea agreement in the June 2008 killings in a Rock Falls apartment of Brock Branson, Kilynna Blake, Dayan Blake and Kenneth Ulve.

He didn’t.

Expensive trials had to be conducted in 2011, 2012 and 2014, respectively, in those Illinois cases to obtain murder convictions and life sentences in prison – the maximum allowed by Illinois law.

In January, Sheley is to be put on trial for the June 2008 killings of Tom and Jill Estes, an Arkansas

Read more at: http://www.saukvalley.com/2017/09/28/a-fate-worse-than-death/avfthre/

35 years later, mass murderer George Banks remains on death row – Wilkes Barre Times

The first call was chilling enough: Two lay shot on a Wilkes-Barre street.

But as Robert Gillespie headed to the scene where George Emil Banks began his massacre 35 years ago this week, the scope of the situation began to mount as the bodies piled up. Gillespie was on Interstate 81 when the next call from a detective informed him of a second crime scene, in Jenkins Township.

Four shot dead.

When Gillespie arrived in Wilkes-Barre, he learned that not only were the two there shot outside a home on Schoolhouse Lane — one fatally — but eight more bullet-riddled bodies were inside.

Four were children. The two youngest were 1.

Decades later, Gillespie can still see them.

“You never forget seeing a child that has been brutally murdered,” said Gillespie, the former Luzerne County district attorney who prosecuted Banks.

Thirty-five years later, Gillespie and Al Flora Jr., one of the attorneys Gillespie battled in the courtroom

Read more at: http://timesleader.com/news/local/676340/35-years-later-mass-murderer-george-banks-remains-on-death-row

Eight people shot to death in Texas home, police say

A gunman allegedly barged into his ex-wife’s home and slaughtered seven people at a Texas football watch party Sunday night – before police responded and killed the shooter.

Two other people were wounded when the unidentified gunman opened fire inside the party at a single-family home off Spring Creek Parkway in Plano, less than 20 minutes from Dallas, around 8 p.m., FOX4 reported. Witnesses said the group was watching the Dallas Cowboys season opener against the New York Giants.

“It sounded like an argument between a woman and a man and it got really loud…next thing you know all you heard was multiple rounds just going off,” Crystal Sugg, who works nearby, told FOX4.

Sugg said she heard a loud argument for about 20 minutes – and then gunshots.

“I heard guns and a lot of screaming,” she said. “All I heard was, ‘Boom, boom, boom, boom, boom.’”

Police did not

Read more at: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/09/10/eight-people-shot-to-death-in-texas-home-police-say.html

Serial killer Sampson appealing 2nd death sentence | New Hampshire

MassLive.com, Springfield, Mass.

August 30. 2017 11:41PM



Convicted serial killer Gary Lee Sampson will appeal his second death sentence, continuing a 16-year legal battle to avoid execution.

The Boston Globe reports that appeal was filed with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit on Monday.

Sampson, 57, was first given the death penalty in 2004 after was found guilty of killing three people during carjackings in the course of a week during 2001. However, that sentence was overturned in 2011 after authorities learned that one of the jurors omitted details on her background, preventing Sampson from receiving a fair and impartial jury.

In November 2016, Sampson was tried again for the three murders. Once again prosecutors asked for the death penalty.

Sampson lived in Abington when he committed the murders and was known as a “drifter.” In his 2004 trial, Sampson pleaded guilty

Read more at: http://www.unionleader.com/article/20170830/NEWS03/170839901

Serial killer Sampson appealing 2nd death sentence

MassLive.com, Springfield, Mass.

August 30. 2017 11:41PM



Convicted serial killer Gary Lee Sampson will appeal his second death sentence, continuing a 16-year legal battle to avoid execution.

The Boston Globe reports that appeal was filed with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit on Monday.

Sampson, 57, was first given the death penalty in 2004 after was found guilty of killing three people during carjackings in the course of a week during 2001. However, that sentence was overturned in 2011 after authorities learned that one of the jurors omitted details on her background, preventing Sampson from receiving a fair and impartial jury.

In November 2016, Sampson was tried again for the three murders. Once again prosecutors asked for the death penalty.

Sampson lived in Abington when he committed the murders and was known as a “drifter.” In his 2004 trial, Sampson pleaded guilty

Read more at: http://www.unionleader.com/article/20170830/NEWS03/170839901

"Death Note" Starts Off Promisingly, Then Gets Lost In Translation

Stanfield’s character, when he arrives, gets an arc that’s similarly condensed — he’s a legendary detective who goes only by the name L, and takes on the unpopular task of tracking down Kira. The eccentric candy chomper is the film’s most overtly cartoonish character, and Stanfield leans into that nicely, disguising himself by pulling a turtleneck over the lower half of his face and folding his lanky limbs into a squat on top of chairs rather than sitting in them. He’s enjoyably weird and, like any good fictional detective, brilliant, which we see in how quickly he homes in on Kira’s true identity. But there’s no space here for the prolonged battle of intellects between L and Light that forms the backbone of the anime series. One of the unfortunate realizations as Death Note churns onward is that it would have been better off either cutting L (to the

Read more at: https://www.buzzfeed.com/alisonwillmore/shall-we-begin